Art in Print

The British Museum launches a touring drawing exhibition 

 
As the practice of drawing has fallen increasingly far by the wayside, the British Museum has decided to launch a new project to revive the reputation of this historical art form. The museum is indeed to lend 70 of its most important drawings for its largest ever touring exhibition, after learning how few students now pick up pencils.

 

According to its curator, the show was inspired by a recent visit from an art school, in which a teacher said that students are now “more likely to have a blog than a sketchbook”. 

 

The touring exhibition will begin at Poole Museum, Dorset, where visitors will be given free sketchbooks to encourage them to draw rather than take photographs. 

 

Via The Telegraph
 

The British Museum will open a new exhibition exploring 100,000 years of South African art 

 

 
One of Africa’s greatest treasures, the 800-year-old golden rhinoceros of Mapungubwe, is to leave the continent for the first time as part of a British Museum exhibition exploring 100,000 years of South African art through more than 200 exhibits. 

 

The exhibition, opening in October, will be divided into sections that will also include the influence of European and Asian settlers and resistance art from the apartheid era and art by contemporary African artists. 

 

Hartwig Fischer, the museum’s director, hoped this exhibition would “challenge audience preconceptions in the way our visitors have come to expect from a British Museum exhibition”. 

 

Via The Guardian 

 

Unique cabinets saved for the nation by the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge 

 
A unique pair of ornate ebony and rosewood cabinets dating from the days of the Italian noble family the Borghese, have been saved for the nation by the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. 

 

The institution managed to raise the money to prevent the Brideshead cabinets from being sold to a foreign buyer for £1.2 million. The National Heritage Memorial Fund gave £700,000 while the Art Fund offered a £200,000 grant. Other offers of support stopped the treasures from leaving the UK.

 

Via The Times