Art in Print

New partnership enables museums to buy art at Frieze

 
 
Since 2010 investment in arts and culture facilities has declined by £236m, which means finding funds for museum acquisitions is problematic. A partnership between Frieze London and the Contemporary Art Society (CAS) brings a new and unexpected lifetime, as they have teamed up on an acquisition fund to support museums across Britain. The £50,000 fund has been awarded to Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (Mima), who have purchased two works at Frieze London: the video installation “Dispossession”, by artist Kaber Attia and the film “Peripeteia” by British  artist John Akomfrah.
 
Via The Financial Times
 

Frieze Art Fair, London – review

 

 
Many of the works on display at Frieze London were created before half the visitors to the fair were born. But all roads lead back to history, and Nicholas Trembley’s “The Nineties” is both the fair’s irresistible popular magnet and its fresh, exciting intellectual core. Art fairs push to extremes the dependency between an artist’s creativity and the commercial art industry. Some of the stands at Frieze act like self-enclosed theatres, offering an insight into the artist’s studio. Hauser & Wirth do just this with an intoxicating mock studio, spluttered with objects including mushroom soup alongside an easel, sculptures and drawings incorporating an expressive and cerebral European sensibility.
 
Via The Financial Times
 
 

Rare Picasso portrait on display in UK for first time

 Portrait of Spanish-born artist Pablo Picasso (1881 - 1973) 
Photo credit: Getty Images
 
Art Enthusiasts are being offered a rare and brief glimpse into the early work of Picasso portrait at the national gallery this month. As part of the gallery’s Picasso Portraits exhibition, a unique example of the artist’s blue period is being displayed in the UK for what is thought to be the first time.
Accompanying its original preparatory sketch is the portrait of Sebastià Junyer i Vidal. The painting is an example of Picasso’s blue period as a young artist in 1903, when he was developing his independent style. With his bulbous forehead, thick bushy hair and handlebar moustache, the subject of the painting is said to have inspired the caricaturist in Picasso. Owned by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, it is rarely given out on loan but an exception was made for this exhibition. And to complement the display, the Museu Picasso has loaned the gallery the original preparatory sketch. The painting will, however, only be available to view until November 6th when it must return to  LA for the museum’s own show.
 
Via: The I
 

Old Master market reels from Sotheby’s fake assessment

 

 
A painting sold by Sotheby’s as the work of Dutch artist Frans Hals for £8.4m has been reassessed by the auction house as fake, triggering fears that more multimillion dollar Old Master works will be exposed as the work of a highly skilled forger. The auction house, which sold the work to an anonymous US buyer by private treaty in mid-2011, ordered pigmentation tests on the painting that concluded it could not have been a genuine work by Hals. Analysis has shown the presence of modern materials that could not have been available in the 17th century. This has triggered fear that more Old Master’s works will be exposed as fake. Another work by 16th century artist Parmigianino has also been called into question. Sotheby’s have retrieved the canvas in order to subject it to tests as well as rescinded the sale and reimbursed the client.
 
Via: The Financial Times